Comments on: Unmasked – Expressive Arts Therapy Directive http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/unmasked/ Inspiring others to create. Wed, 09 Aug 2017 23:41:33 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 By: Connie Robbins-Brady http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/unmasked/#comment-76354 Wed, 19 Dec 2012 16:51:23 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=3178#comment-76354 We did a mask activity in grad school, and I’ve done it one-on-one with clients. A couple of quick tips on plaster masks: make sure the plaster materials is ok for this use. There is a variety of plaster that heats up as it cures. You don’t want your client to be uncomfortable.
Also, look for non-latex gloves, more and more people are developing allergies to latex/rubber, especially powdered gloves. There are great non-latex gloves available as well.
The mask can be quick-dried in a microwave oven, using medium setting and short 1-2 minute times. Watch to make sure it doesn’t burn or ignite.
This is a great activity and can be very profound, I prefer to do it in small, one on one sessions to provide more support to the individual.

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By: Javier Nolasco Guillén http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/unmasked/#comment-42801 Tue, 16 Oct 2012 06:05:12 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=3178#comment-42801 La realización de máscaras da muy buen resultado, es una técnica que la aplico con adolescentes en desventaja social (sobre todo mujeres), pero no realizamos las máscaras para usarlas y que dejen salir sus temores, las utilizamos para que la adolescentes creen personajes con quienes se identifiquen (niños, animales, brujas,etc.)
Al hacer esto los participantes dejan brotar sus sentimientos en las formas decorativas y los colores que utilizan, muchas veces se utilizaron las máscaras para que las adolescentes hablen con ellas y descarguen su ira. Ahí esta la parte reveladora del trabajo con máscaras. También me funcionó muy bien este aspecto construyendo títeres.

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By: siti abdul http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/unmasked/#comment-42793 Tue, 16 Oct 2012 04:30:28 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=3178#comment-42793 Hi Deah,

Thanks a million for sharing this wonderful ideas of having creative arts activities. Before I go further, it is suitable to introduce myself. I am Siti Abdul, a registered counsellor in Malaysia. I am currently heavily involved in this project with kids and teenagers.

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By: Dr. Deah Schwartz http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/unmasked/#comment-42755 Mon, 15 Oct 2012 15:32:05 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=3178#comment-42755 Hi Eileen,
Thank you for your comment as well. This may not have been my best example of clear directive description. It is much easier presenting activity directives verbally than writing them down step by step. And you and Sarah are both totally correct that this would be an activity to use that requires a higher level of risk taking and to be used with clients who have been working for a while on these treatment issues. To clarify a bit, mask making is often used to explore the mask. Who are you presenting to the world? But using it to explore the positive aspects or unknown aspects of ourselves that we are hiding is a deeper and more threatening experience. It can also be liberating and empowering. Thanks!!

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By: Dr. Deah Schwartz http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/unmasked/#comment-42754 Mon, 15 Oct 2012 15:23:52 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=3178#comment-42754 Hi Sarah, thanks for your comment. I understand what you are saying and here are my thoughts. In almost all of the directives that I use and share in this blog there are always options for where to “go” with the directive. In this one the choices I listed are under the objectives and do not all require the same level of unmasking. If someone finds the activity too revealing, then that in itself is good information. At that point I would suggest creating a mask that explores the fears associated with unmasking or open it up to the client and ask them to create the mask that represents something related to this issue that the are comfortable with and perhaps later on they will come back to this and create another mask, increasing the “risk” level as they are ready. I also NEVER force anyone to share their work in a group who is not ready. I really appreciate you giving me the opportunity to clarify this and I will incorporate your feedback!

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By: Eileen Schaff http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/unmasked/#comment-42662 Sun, 14 Oct 2012 13:45:17 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=3178#comment-42662 Masks can be insightful and lots of fun. But I wonder if this activity could be confusing and difficult (or a more ‘serious’ activity than I would choose?) I have used cheap photocopied card masks to show the various aspects of personality- the perceived and the hoped for/ future for instance, where the participants may be able to discuss and compare realities, especially with body/eating issues in mind, and this has worked well, without asking people to ‘unmask’ themselves and perhaps becoming more uncomfortable. Hope this helps.

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By: Sarah http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/unmasked/#comment-42660 Sun, 14 Oct 2012 12:34:13 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=3178#comment-42660 Hello,

your mask idea is a good one but… as a sufferer of body hate and eating disorders I would not declare to anyone what it is that I mask my body with…that to me is counterproductive for why you mask you body in the first place. I use my mask into to hide, not to explain to people why I hide. or perhaps I have missed the whole concept?

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