Comments on: Making Hand Puppets or Glove Puppets For Kids & Groups http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/making-hand-glove-puppets-for-kids-groups/ Inspiring others to create. Wed, 09 Aug 2017 23:41:33 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 By: dr deah http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/making-hand-glove-puppets-for-kids-groups/#comment-324715 Thu, 15 Jan 2015 00:57:29 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=2803#comment-324715 Javier, utilizando metáforas de llaves, cerraduras y puertas en los proyectos son muy eficaces con la población que está describiendo. Pídales que dibujen o collage lo que quieren guardar bajo llave y mantener a salvo, lo que se abrirían si pudieran y compartir. Usted puede hacer una puerta fácilmente de una carpeta de archivos y tener a diseñar la parte exterior de la puerta y luego abren la carpeta y poner en el lado de lo que quieren mantener a salvo, lo que se esconden detrás de la puerta, que no quieren para dejar salir de la habitación detrás de la puerta, etc. Espero que esto ayude!

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By: Javier Nolasco http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/making-hand-glove-puppets-for-kids-groups/#comment-15583 Tue, 21 Feb 2012 05:53:14 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=2803#comment-15583 Hola, sus ideas para los títeres me vienen muy bien ya que estoy preparando algunas sesiones de sensibilización y auto conocimiento con un grupo de niñas en un centro de acogida, ellas tienen problemas de relacionamiento y de adaptación al medio porque tienen historias de vida llenas de maltrato, violencia y abuso. Por favor que me pueden sugerir para trabajar con ellas proyectos de vida?, son adolescentes de 12 a 14 años. Gracias, esperaré sus sugerencias. Muchos éxitos. Javier.

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By: Angela Susan Harrison http://www.arttherapyblog.com/art-therapy-activities/making-hand-glove-puppets-for-kids-groups/#comment-15573 Tue, 21 Feb 2012 02:05:46 +0000 http://www.arttherapyblog.com/?p=2803#comment-15573 I love the Art of making puppets for the children. We made some woven woolen finger puppets and used cardboard oblong pieces, to make a loom. The finished woven cloth was folded and stitched to fit over a finger. Faces were made, by stitching eyes, noses, and lips, and when the puppet is made, then the children can make dressups, out of cloth, wool, or paper. A circular board, or cylindrical shape can be used for threading wool through pierced holes, this is excellent for eye coordination.I painted some owls to begin with, then adapted the pictures into finger puppets. Birds can be dangled on a iece of embroidery thread, and if one wants to create a water scene, then small balloons can be used, painted features, then dangled and dipped into a bowl of water. Silhouette puppets can be made from black cardboard, cut-outs, and a white sheet pinned onto a blind or curtain, with torch light, as a bedtime story. The chidren can draw figures, cut out and act out the story, in a dark atmosphere, with torch. Soft background Music can create sound effects!Jigsaw puzzles are always fun for children, and even can be a form of intrigue in puppetry! By drawing characters on cardboard then placing them on a background, the child can create a story by introducing certain objects, or eliminating forms, to develop a sense of proportion and dimension, and placement! Textures can be introduced, ie soft,hard,eg furry,crinkly,cellophane,woolen,silken,netted,nylon,cotton,grass,peel.I have been creating some touch and feel sensory boards, and maybe introducing puppetry will help a child with a visual, hearing impairment, to feel areas, and finger paint, or manoevre pieces into place. Nice to read about these ideas in Art Therapy as I am interested in assisting children, with Impairments, and have returned to Disability Studies, early this year.

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